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Dewazakura Brewing Company


Dewazakura Brewing Company

Many sake enthusiasts are surprised to learn that twenty-five years ago ginjo labels were hard to find in Japan. In those days, people were still drinking the cloyingly sweet sakes the breweries had been churning out since the fifties; no one thought that customers would actually pay more for the quality ginjo and daiginjo sakes brewed in limited amounts for competitions.

In 1981, Dewazakura Brewing Company changed that with the release of "Oka," an affordably priced ginjo label with a polishing ratio of 50 percent and a lovely floral aroma. It was light, crisp and delightful. It was made to be drunk cold. Soon other breweries introduced their own ginjo labels. And so began one of the most creative periods in the history of sake, earning for Dewazakura the admiration and respect of even its most ardent competitors.

What made the brewery stand out was a drive for innovation. Dewazakura was not a wealthy brewery, or a long-established one, but they were open to change. When the opportunity arose in the years after the war to invite research technicians in from the National Research Institute of Brewing, they jumped at the chance. Drawing on the knowledge and skill of Hideo Abe, a former Institute research advisor, they put new ideas into practice without hesitation.

By 1991, Dewazakura had perfected its cold storage technique, aging freshly pressed sake at 28 degrees Fahrenheit to keep it as aromatic and flavorful as possible until bottling. In 1996 it introduced "Dewasansan," brewed from a new Yamagata rice strain of the same name, another hit which opened the way for other prefectures to introduce highly specific regional labels. This year, for the first time in history, Yamagata breweries received more gold medals than any other prefecture at the 2004 Japan National Sake Appraisal, an achievement due in no small measure to the pioneering efforts of the Dewazakura Brewing Company.

Dewazakura “Daiginjo”
Dewazakura “Daiginjo”
Mountain Cherry
Fragrant, smooth, reminiscent of softly melting snow
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Dewazakura “Dewasansan”
Dewazakura “Dewasansan”
Green Ridge
Mellow, with green-apple tartness and a refreshing finish
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Dewazakura “Ichiro”
Dewazakura “Ichiro”
Abbey Road
Billowing meadowy flavors, then a dry, gently fading finish
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Dewazakura “Izumi Judan”
Dewazakura “Izumi Judan”
Tenth Degree
A potent ginjo sake for martini fans—crisp and bone dry
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Dewazakura “Mini-Daiginjo”
Dewazakura “Mini-Daiginjo”
Sakura Boy
Easy drinkability with a clean, invigorating finish
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Dewazakura “Namagenshu”
Dewazakura “Namagenshu”
Green Ridge
Brisk and clean, with an engaging lift at first sip
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Dewazakura “Oka”
Dewazakura “Oka”
Cherry Bouquet
Delightful, flowery bouquet with a touch of pear and melon
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Dewazakura “Omachi”
Dewazakura “Omachi”
Jewel Brocade
An ornate, full-flavored ginjo, using Japan’s ancestral brewing rice
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Dewazakura “Tobiroku”
Dewazakura “Tobiroku”
Festival of Stars
Dry, crisp and effervescent: an exhilarating sake for champagne lovers
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Dewazakura “Yukimanman”
Dewazakura “Yukimanman”
Snow Country
Elegantly nuanced, with notes of pomegranate and persimmon
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